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Feel Good

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Alzheimer's disease: Music, meditation may improve early cognitive decline

So this month I did some Dementia Training with Walsall Council and A Company called Mindful Gifts who specialise in gifts for people with Dementia.  

I found it a heart wrenching yet hopeful piece of training.  It highlighted how horrific an illness it is, but also how many new ideas are helping support people with Dementia and their families.

I was even more inspired to come across this article as I have been working with Music as a source of healing and inquiry these past few weeks!

See below for more...

Meditation and music listening programs have shown promise in improving measures of cognitive and memory in adults with subjective cognitive decline, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

 

 

 

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5 ways to hold on to optimism — and reap health benefits

We came across this great article by Harvard Health and wanted to share it with you.  Fantastic affirmation of the work we already do here at Cherish Healing!

In these turbulent times, it may be a struggle to maintain a glass half full view of life. A poll just released by the Associated Press on New Year’s Day indicated that most Americans came out of 2016 feeling pretty discouraged. Only 18% feel things for the country got better, 33% said things got worse, and 47% believe things were unchanged from 2015.

However, 55% of those surveyed said they expect their own lives to improve in 2017. If you are among this majority, it may serve you well. A growing body of research indicates that optimism — a sense everything will be OK — is linked to a reduced risk of developing mental or physical health issues as well as to an increased chance of a longer life.

One of the largest such studies was led by researchers Dr. Kaitlin Hagan and Dr. Eric Kim at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Their team analyzed data from 70,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, and found that women who were optimistic had a significantly reduced risk of dying from several major causes of death over an eight-year period, compared with women who were less optimistic. The most optimistic women had a 16% lower risk of dying from cancer; 38% lower risk of dying from heart disease; 39% lower risk of dying from stroke; 38% lower risk of dying from respiratory disease; and 52% lower risk of dying from infection.

Yes, you can acquire optimism.

Even if you consider yourself a pessimist, there’s hope. Dr. Hagan notes that a few simple changes can help people improve your outlook on life. Previous studies have shown that optimism can be instilled by something as simple as having people think about the best possible outcomes in various areas of their lives,” she says. The following may help you see the world through rosier glasses:

1. Accentuate the positive. Keep a journal. In each entry, underline the good things that have happened, as well as things you’ve enjoyed and concentrate on them. Consider how they came about and what you can do to keep them coming.

2. Eliminate the negative. If you find yourself ruminating on negative situations, do something to short-circuit that train of thought. Turn on your favorite music, reread a novel you love, or get in touch with a good friend.

3. Act locally. Don’t fret about your inability to influence global affairs. Instead, do something that can make a small positive change — like donating clothes to a relief organization, helping clean or replant a neighborhood park, or volunteering at an after-school program.

4. Be easier on yourself. Self-compassion is a characteristic shared by most optimists. You can be kind to yourself by taking good care of your body, eating well, exercising, and getting enough sleep. Take stock of your assets and concentrate on them. Finally, try to forgive yourself for past transgressions (real or imagined) and move on.

5. Learn mindfulness. Adopting the practice of purposely focusing your attention on the present moment and accepting it without judgment can go a long way in helping you deal with unpleasant events. If you need help, many health centers now offer mindfulness training. There are also a multitude of books and videos to guide you.

Or click here for you free online meditation

 

 

 

Thanks to Beverly MerzExecutive Editor, Harvard Women's Health Watch

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In the eye of the beholder

I put on a little weight recently, and to be honest I haven't been feeling too beautiful of late.. .So I was delighted to hear that my old tutor had created a series of free videos and a online course, exploring ideas around attractiveness and beauty. 

Mark Walsh is a friend, my tutor, a global embodiment coach and trainer, and in this clip he shares some unique perspectives on beauty with his wife Daria Walsh as part of the Beauty Blackbelt course he has launched this week. 

 

 

 

 

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101 Stress Busting ideas from the Mental Health Foundation

To keep on top of how Cherish Healing can support our clients we research the best information out there in the world.  The Mental Health Foundation is up there are one of the best.  Here are a collection of their list provided by the public!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      1.    Meeting a friend

2.    Set aside 10 minutes a day to relax and collect my thoughts

3.    Watching late night TV debates that deal with the realities of the world

4.    Listening to relaxing music

5.    Watching funny movies

6.    Taking a good walk in the countryside

7.    Going to the gym

8.    Soaking in the bath with lavender oil

9.    Meditating

10.    Talking to someone just to vent a little

11.    Walking the dog

12.    Getting more sleep

13.    Praying

14.    Reading a book to distract yourself from your stressful thoughts

15.    Do something good for someone else

To read the rest click here

 

 

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How To Meditate: Meditation Made Simple For Beginners

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How To Meditate: Meditation Made Simple For Beginners

A lot of people are put off meditation, thinking it is difficult to master. However, this Huffington Post article explains meditation simply. 

"Why meditate? Meditation is a powerful tool that can reduce stress, help our physical health, ease chronic pain and support better sleep. Meditation has also been proven to..."

Click Here For Full Article

To find out more about meditation and ho Cherish Healing can help you, click here...

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Mindful Listening and Body Language

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Mindful Listening and Body Language

Listening mindfully to other people can really help to communicate your care for them and make their day that little bit better.

"I have often been curious about how they listened that made it so restorative to receive. How could I too give that gift of mindful listening to my children, my husband, and my friends — indeed, everyone I meet — so that they too bloom like flowers, as I did in their presence?

This is how they listened, and indeed how we all can listen to...."

Click Here For Full Article

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Morning Motivation

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Morning Motivation

Namaste. My name is Lucie, I’m currently a placement student adjusting to the working world. One thing I’m sure about: it’s not until you try it yourself, that you find out how difficult it can be waking up in the morning Monday to Friday after a late night of work. I’ve probably experienced the majority of physical states one can experience in a 9-5 job. Motivation, excitement, laziness, and tiredness – you name it. If there’s a thing many of us have in common it’s that we all can find it difficult to get out of bed time to time. Whether it’s after a late night or interrupted sleep, we enjoy having a few extra minutes after the alarm goes off. Once its time to get out of bed, thoughts such as “do I really neeeed to get up?” “Do I really neeeeed to go into work today?” and picturing yourself staying in bed for a few more hours.

However, once we get into work we end up waking up and being in a better mood. Here are my top 2 tips that I would advise you to follow if you feel demotivated to wake up/get out of bed during the early hours of the day:


1.   Think of how what you will be doing in the day will benefit you in the short and long term. Is there someone you’re doing it for? You may be going into work for overtime so you can buy that special someone his or her favourite gift. Whatever the reason behind the planned day activities, also try to remember they will either benefit you or someone you care about, eventually.


2.   If you wake up wide-awake a few minutes before your alarm – get out of bed. Try to avoid falling back to sleep when you have woken as you will feel a lot more tired once your alarm goes off, making it more difficult to recover in the morning. 

By Lucie Fialova

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7 Of The Best Spots In Dublin To Try Out Yoga For The First Time

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7 Of The Best Spots In Dublin To Try Out Yoga For The First Time

Travelling to Dublin this year? Check out this article which mentions some of the best spots you can visit in Dublin and not miss out on your daily yoga sesh!

"Here are some of our favourite spots to stretch and get a little limber, all of which are absolutely perfect for people at the very start of their journey. Your body will thank you for it later, we promise. Namaste. "

Click Here For Full Article

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Yoga May Be The Medicine Aboriginal Communities Have Been Looking For

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Yoga May Be The Medicine Aboriginal Communities Have Been Looking For

A lovely article that shows that yoga is for everybody and has lasting benefits for those who practice it..

"One night, “a spark went off” in his head. “I didn’t have the courage to kill myself, but I didn’t have the strength to live,” Terrance told The Huffington Post Canada in an interview. “I thought ‘OK, I need to do something about this.’" Terrance was...."

Click Here For Full Article

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Immerse Yourself In Nature To Restore Balance

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Immerse Yourself In Nature To Restore Balance

Some of us get carried away every now and then that we forgot to appreciate the nature around us and its benefits. Why not take a minute or two every day to acknowledge the beautiful world around us - you will slowly start the see the world in a different, more appreciative way :)

"We all feel stress now and then — it’s simply part of modern life. But when our stress levels get too high or don’t subside, we want relief. Can we regain a sense of calm and get results with an all-natural remedy? The short answer is “Yes!”..."

For Full Article Click Here

 

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Yoga saved my life: three people share their stories

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Yoga saved my life: three people share their stories

Three lovely stories that tell us how yoga has helped people in life..

"At a time of difficulty last year I found comfort in yoga. I went through a period of torturous insomnia that left me wide awake every night until 3am, begging for my brain to switch off. I’d heard that yoga could help so started going to a local class. Immediately, I felt better. I loved how slow and methodical it was, and the fact that teachers discussed mindful and positive thinking. These were all things I’d heard little about before. Gradually, as I de-stressed and learned to relax, my sleep improved. I even used to go through the poses in my head before bed, which always helped me drift off..." 

Click Here For Full Article

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Nina Simone - Feeling Good

 

10 facts you didn't know about Nina Simone

Nina Simone wished she could downshift her singing career from artistic pursuit to mindless job, where it could be more about delivering sound than soul. She couldn't do it. Simone gave everything to her melodies, each syncopated, rambunctious, fully-charged musical numbers drenched in emotion. Whether the songs were about love, loss, or fighting for equality, they had to emerge from her heart, a task that took its toll on her mental and physical health over the years. Nina Simone remains one of the greatest performers who ever lived and it came at a price.

In What Happened, Miss Simone?, documentarian Liz Garbus (Bobby Fischer Against the World and Love, Marilyn) strings together never-before-seen archival footage, long-lost recordings, and talking head interviews with some of the singer's closest friends and family, to present an expansive look at Simone's life. The film debuted at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival this week. 

Here's what we learned after soaking up the impassioned doc:

Simone Dreamed of Becoming the First Black Classical Pianist

Growing up in the 1940s, Simone honed her musical skills by playing piano for the local church. The hobby blossomed into a passion when the community raised money for Simone to learn classical concertos from a white teacher. “This Bach — I liked him!” she says in Garbus's film. From that point on, Simone strove to become the world's first black classical pianist, applying to Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music after high school. She was rejected based on her race. Steadfast, she wound up at New York City's Julliard School of Music.

She Changed Her Name to Avoid Offending Her Religious Mother

To earn a living, Simone played piano at a restaurant in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The job had one requirement: The keyboard tunes needed vocals. Hers. Adding singing to her repertoire, Simone played every type of music under the sun — jazz, blues, and classical all mixing together — evolving into her unique sound. Worried that her new career turn may offend her mother back home, the musician, originally born Eunice Waymon, changed her name to “Nina Simone,” a combination of the Spanish word for “little girl” and French actress Simone Signoret' 

For more on this article click here

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